Cyber Security

Security convergence is the consolidation of traditionally disparate risk management spheres of influence, Physical Security, Information Security and Compliance into a unified view of risk. Find Out More.

Compliance

We maintain extensive partnerships with regional accounting and audit firms. Find Out More.

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New England Safety Partners helps small and medium sized business with comprehensive Risk Management services in cyber securityphysical security and compliance management.

Please contact us for details. 

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Proud Sponsor of the Boston Chapter of InfraGard

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NESP consultants had a very thorough understanding of the PCI-DSS requirement. (The word ‘encyclopedic’ comes to mind.) This was very helpful in areas where the written standard leaves room for interpretation. In those situations, they helped us to assess our risk and to develop practical solutions.

They brought strong operating systems and networking expertise. They quickly earned the respect of, and collaborated effectively with, our technical staff. Consistently their recommendations were technically sound.

Information Security Staff Member, Large University

Working with technology and people can be messy and a sometimes befuddling proposition. NESP exercised effective people skills in balance with deep understanding of project technical issues to yield positive results for ITG.

CEO, Interactive Tactical Group

NESP was a strong business partner on information security issues particularly as they related to our employees, data security, data access and data controls. They were instrumental in putting a robust information security program in place for the organization, and for educating senior management on the criticality of security awareness. They demonstrated strong technical expertise, but also had the ability to align with business demands/appetite.

VP HR, Property and Casualty Insurance Company

New Spectre-Like Attacks

There’s new research that demonstrates security vulnerabilities in all of the AMD and Intel chips with micro-op caches, including the ones that were specifically engineered to be resistant to the Spectre/Meltdown attacks of three years ago.

Details:

The new line of attacks exploits the micro-op cache: an on-chip structure that speeds up computing by storing simple commands and allowing the processor to fetch them quickly and early in the speculative execution process, as the team explains in a writeup from the University of Virginia. Even though the processor quickly realizes its mistake and does a U-turn to go down the right path, attackers can get at the private data while the processor is still heading in the wrong direction…

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Malicious Office 365 Apps Are the Ultimate Insiders

Phishers targeting Microsoft Office 365 users increasingly are turning to specialized links that take users to their organization’s own email login page. After a user logs in, the link prompts them to install a malicious but innocuously-named app that gives the attacker persistent, password-free access to any of the user’s emails and files, both of which are then plundered to launch malware and phishing scams against others.

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Tesla Remotely Hacked from a Drone

This is an impressive hack:

Security researchers Ralf-Philipp Weinmann of Kunnamon, Inc. and Benedikt Schmotzle of Comsecuris GmbH have found remote zero-click security vulnerabilities in an open-source software component (ConnMan) used in Tesla automobiles that allowed them to compromise parked cars and control their infotainment systems over WiFi. It would be possible for an attacker to unlock the doors and trunk, change seat positions, both steering and acceleration modes — in short, pretty much what a driver pressing various buttons on the console can do. This attack does not yield drive control of the car though…

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Identifying the Person Behind Bitcoin Fog

The person behind the Bitcoin Fog was identified and arrested. Bitcoin Fog was an anonymization service: for a fee, it mixed a bunch of people’s bitcoins up so that it was hard to figure out where any individual coins came from. It ran for ten years.

Identifying the person behind Bitcoin Fog serves as an illustrative example of how hard it is to be anonymous online in the face of a competent police investigation:

Most remarkable, however, is the IRS’s account of tracking down Sterlingov using the very same sort of blockchain analysis that his own service was meant to defeat. The complaint outlines how Sterlingov allegedly paid for the server hosting of Bitcoin Fog at one point in 2011 using the now-defunct digital currency Liberty Reserve. It goes on to show the blockchain evidence that identifies Sterlingov’s purchase of that Liberty Reserve currency with bitcoins: He first exchanged euros for the bitcoins on the early cryptocurrency exchange Mt. Gox, then moved those bitcoins through several subsequent addresses, and finally traded them on another currency exchange for the Liberty Reserve funds he’d use to set up Bitcoin Fog’s domain…

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Serious MacOS Vulnerability Patched

Apple just patched a MacOS vulnerability that bypassed malware checks.

The flaw is akin to a front entrance that’s barred and bolted effectively, but with a cat door at the bottom that you can easily toss a bomb through. Apple mistakenly assumed that applications will always have certain specific attributes. Owens discovered that if he made an application that was really just a script—code that tells another program what do rather than doing it itself—and didn’t include a standard application metadata file called “info.plist,” he could silently run the app on any Mac. The operating system wouldn’t even give its most basic prompt: “This is an application downloaded from the Internet. Are you sure you want to open it?”…

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Serious MacOS Vulnerability Patched

Apple just patched a MacOS vulnerability that bypassed malware checks.

The flaw is akin to a front entrance that’s barred and bolted effectively, but with a cat door at the bottom that you can easily toss a bomb through. Apple mistakenly assumed that applications will always have certain specific attributes. Owens discovered that if he made an application that was really just a script—code that tells another program what do rather than doing it itself—and didn’t include a standard application metadata file called “info.plist,” he could silently run the app on any Mac. The operating system wouldn’t even give its most basic prompt: “This is an application downloaded from the Internet. Are you sure you want to open it?”…

read more