Cyber Security

Security convergence is the consolidation of traditionally disparate risk management spheres of influence, Physical Security, Information Security and Compliance into a unified view of risk. Find Out More.

Compliance

We maintain extensive partnerships with regional accounting and audit firms. Find Out More.

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New England Safety Partners helps small and medium sized business with comprehensive Risk Management services in cyber securityphysical security and compliance management.

Please contact us for details. 

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NESP consultants had a very thorough understanding of the PCI-DSS requirement. (The word ‘encyclopedic’ comes to mind.) This was very helpful in areas where the written standard leaves room for interpretation. In those situations, they helped us to assess our risk and to develop practical solutions.

They brought strong operating systems and networking expertise. They quickly earned the respect of, and collaborated effectively with, our technical staff. Consistently their recommendations were technically sound.

Information Security Staff Member, Large University

Working with technology and people can be messy and a sometimes befuddling proposition. NESP exercised effective people skills in balance with deep understanding of project technical issues to yield positive results for ITG.

CEO, Interactive Tactical Group

NESP was a strong business partner on information security issues particularly as they related to our employees, data security, data access and data controls. They were instrumental in putting a robust information security program in place for the organization, and for educating senior management on the criticality of security awareness. They demonstrated strong technical expertise, but also had the ability to align with business demands/appetite.

VP HR, Property and Casualty Insurance Company

KrebsOnSecurity Hit By Huge New IoT Botnet “Meris”

On Thursday evening, KrebsOnSecurity was the subject of a rather massive (and mercifully brief) distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack. The assault came from “Meris,” the same new “Internet of Things” (IoT) botnet behind record-shattering attacks against Russian search giant Yandex this week and internet infrastructure firm Cloudflare earlier this summer.

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ProtonMail Now Keeps IP Logs

After being compelled by a Swiss court to monitor IP logs for a particular user, ProtonMail no longer claims that “we do not keep any IP logs.”

EDITED TO ADD (9/14): This seems to be more complicated. ProtonMail is not yet saying that they keep logs. Their privacy policy still states that they do not keep logs except in certain circumstances, and outlines those circumstances. And ProtonMail’s warrant canary has an interesting list of data orders they have received from various authorities, whether they complied, and why or why not.

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Microsoft: Attackers Exploiting Windows Zero-Day Flaw

Microsoft Corp. warned Tuesday that attackers are exploiting a previously unknown vulnerability in Windows 10 and many Windows Server versions to seize control over PCs when users open a malicious document or visit a booby-trapped website. There is currently no official patch for the flaw, but Microsoft has released recommendations for mitigating the threat.

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“FudCo” Spam Empire Tied to Pakistani Software Firm

In May 2015, KrebsOnSecurity briefly profiled “The Manipulaters,” the name chosen by a prolific cybercrime group based in Pakistan that was very publicly selling spam tools and a range of services for crafting, hosting and deploying malicious email. Six years later, a review of the social media postings from this group shows they are prospering, while rather poorly hiding their activities behind a software development firm in Lahore that has secretly enabled an entire generation of spammers and scammers.

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Tracking People by their MAC Addresses

Yet another article on the privacy risks of static MAC addresses and always-on Bluetooth connections. This one is about wireless headphones.

The good news is that product vendors are fixing this:

Several of the headphones which could be tracked over time are for sale in electronics stores, but according to two of the manufacturers NRK have spoken to, these models are being phased out.

“The products in your line-up, Elite Active 65t, Elite 65e and Evolve 75e, will be going out of production before long and newer versions have already been launched with randomized MAC addresses. We have a lot of focus on privacy by design and we continuously work with the available security measures on the market,” head of PR at Jabra, Claus Fonnesbech says…

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