Cyber Security

Security convergence is the consolidation of traditionally disparate risk management spheres of influence, Physical Security, Information Security and Compliance into a unified view of risk. Find Out More.

Compliance

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New England Safety Partners helps small and medium sized business with comprehensive Risk Management services in cyber securityphysical security and compliance management.

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NESP consultants had a very thorough understanding of the PCI-DSS requirement. (The word ‘encyclopedic’ comes to mind.) This was very helpful in areas where the written standard leaves room for interpretation. In those situations, they helped us to assess our risk and to develop practical solutions.

They brought strong operating systems and networking expertise. They quickly earned the respect of, and collaborated effectively with, our technical staff. Consistently their recommendations were technically sound.

Information Security Staff Member, Large University

Working with technology and people can be messy and a sometimes befuddling proposition. NESP exercised effective people skills in balance with deep understanding of project technical issues to yield positive results for ITG.

CEO, Interactive Tactical Group

NESP was a strong business partner on information security issues particularly as they related to our employees, data security, data access and data controls. They were instrumental in putting a robust information security program in place for the organization, and for educating senior management on the criticality of security awareness. They demonstrated strong technical expertise, but also had the ability to align with business demands/appetite.

VP HR, Property and Casualty Insurance Company

Friday Squid Blogging: Interview with a Squid Researcher

Interview with Mike Vecchione, Curator of Cephalopoda — now that’s a job title — at the Smithsonian Museum of National History.

One reason they’re so interesting is they are intelligent invertebrates. Almost everything that we think of as being intelligent — parrots, dolphins, etc. — are vertebrates, so their brains are built on the same basic structure. Whereas cephalopod brains have evolved from a ring of nerves around the esophagus. It’s a form of intelligence that’s completely independent from ours.

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven’t covered…

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The Legal Risks of Security Research

Sunoo Park and Kendra Albert have published “A Researcher’s Guide to Some Legal Risks of Security Research.”

From a summary:

Such risk extends beyond anti-hacking laws, implicating copyright law and anti-circumvention provisions (DMCA §1201), electronic privacy law (ECPA), and cryptography export controls, as well as broader legal areas such as contract and trade secret law.

Our Guide gives the most comprehensive presentation to date of this landscape of legal risks, with an eye to both legal and technical nuance. Aimed at researchers, the public, and technology lawyers alike, its aims both to provide pragmatic guidance to those navigating today’s uncertain legal landscape, and to provoke public debate towards future reform…

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Tracking Users on Waze

A security researcher discovered a wulnerability in Waze that breaks the anonymity of users:

I found out that I can visit Waze from any web browser at waze.com/livemap so I decided to check how are those driver icons implemented. What I found is that I can ask Waze API for data on a location by sending my latitude and longitude coordinates. Except the essential traffic information, Waze also sends me coordinates of other drivers who are nearby. What caught my eyes was that identification numbers (ID) associated with the icons were not changing over time. I decided to track one driver and after some time she really appeared in a different place on the same road…

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FBI, DHS, HHS Warn of Imminent, Credible Ransomware Threat Against U.S. Hospitals

On Monday, Oct. 27, KrebsOnSecurity began following up on a tip from a reliable source that an aggressive Russian cybercriminal gang known for deploying ransomware was preparing to disrupt information technology systems at hundreds of hospitals, clinics and medical care facilities across the United States. Today, officials from the FBI and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security hastily assembled a conference call with healthcare industry executives warning about an “imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.”

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Security Blueprints of Many Companies Leaked in Hack of Swedish Firm Gunnebo

In March 2020, KrebsOnSecurity alerted Swedish security giant Gunnebo Group that hackers had broken into its network and sold the access to a criminal group which specializes in deploying ransomware. In August, Gunnebo said it had successfully thwarted a ransomware attack, but this week it emerged that the intruders stole and published online tens of thousands of sensitive documents — including schematics of client bank vaults and surveillance systems.

The Gunnebo Group is a Swedish multinational company that provides physical security to a variety of clients globally, including banks, government agencies, airports, casinos, jewelry stores, tax agencies and even nuclear power plants. The company has operations in 25 countries, more than 4,000 employees, and billions in revenue annually.

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The NSA is Refusing to Disclose its Policy on Backdooring Commercial Products

Senator Ron Wyden asked, and the NSA didn’t answer:

The NSA has long sought agreements with technology companies under which they would build special access for the spy agency into their products, according to disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and reporting by Reuters and others.

These so-called back doors enable the NSA and other agencies to scan large amounts of traffic without a warrant. Agency advocates say the practice has eased collection of vital intelligence in other countries, including interception of terrorist communications…

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